Low Band is still alive

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ecps92
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Low Band is still alive

#1 Post by ecps92 » 18 Nov 2019 07:04

Yet, seems to be avoided by most monitors.
http://forums.radioreference.com/thread ... st-3214239

Based on the RR Thread, there is still plenty in user, here in New England, time to get the Low Band SNE DB updated.
Bill Dunn N1KUG
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"The tougher it is to find a frequency, the more it makes me want to work to find it. - I've learned to use the SEARCH Button"

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trp
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Re: Low Band is still alive

#2 Post by trp » 18 Nov 2019 17:01

ecps92 wrote:
18 Nov 2019 07:04
...Based on the RR Thread, there is still plenty in user, here in New England, time to get the Low Band SNE DB updated.
To get the best performance out of your VHF-Low monitoring endeavors you'll need a base station antenna that was designed/manufactured to receive the 30-50 MHz VHF-Low band. Some of the classic scanner antennas that covered VHF-Low quite well were the Antennacraft ST2 Scantenna (also sold under the Radio Shack brand name as catalog numbers 20-042 and 20-044), Antenna Specialists MON/MONR Monitor Series (those specific A/S antenna models that were designed/advertised for VHF-Low) , Channel Master 5094/5094A/5095A Monitenna, Winegard SM-2200 and the Grove Scanner Beam.
trp

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Re: Low Band is still alive

#3 Post by garys » 18 Nov 2019 20:05

I don't think any of those are still made, are they?

I get reasonable low band with my new Tram 1410, but the 1411 would be better. Both are discones, but the 1411 has a whip on top.
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trp
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Re: Low Band is still alive

#4 Post by trp » 18 Nov 2019 20:41

garys wrote:
18 Nov 2019 20:05
I don't think any of those are still made, are they?...
You're correct in that none of those "classic" VHF-Low scanner antennas that I mentioned in my post #2 above are in current production. You can, however, find them listed for sale occasionally (both brand-new and used) on eBay, Craigslist and in the Scan New England and Radio Reference classifieds. Some of the asking prices have been outrageously high but you can sometimes find a very reasonable deal. YMMV
trp

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ecps92
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Re: Low Band is still alive

#5 Post by ecps92 » 19 Nov 2019 06:55

Yes, if you are going for DX, but local listening is fine with the Stock Antenna or even the ole Extendables
trp wrote:
18 Nov 2019 17:01
ecps92 wrote:
18 Nov 2019 07:04
...Based on the RR Thread, there is still plenty in user, here in New England, time to get the Low Band SNE DB updated.
To get the best performance out of your VHF-Low monitoring endeavors you'll need a base station antenna that was designed/manufactured to receive the 30-50 MHz VHF-Low band. Some of the classic scanner antennas that covered VHF-Low quite well were the Antennacraft ST2 Scantenna (also sold under the Radio Shack brand name as catalog numbers 20-042 and 20-044), Antenna Specialists MON/MONR Monitor Series (those specific A/S antenna models that were designed/advertised for VHF-Low) , Channel Master 5094/5094A/5095A Monitenna, Winegard SM-2200 and the Grove Scanner Beam.
Bill Dunn N1KUG
Cruise Ship Frequencies
http://scanmaritime.com

"The tougher it is to find a frequency, the more it makes me want to work to find it. - I've learned to use the SEARCH Button"

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Scott
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Re: Low Band is still alive

#6 Post by Scott » 19 Nov 2019 08:33

Low band still can be a lot of fun from a DX perspective. All of the above antennas are great but as noted so hard to find.

So...if you have the space and the time, why not roll your own and build a half wave dipole you can mount somewhere vertically? There is a ton of info on the interwebs about how to do so, and this tool will calculate the dimensions for you. You an cut it to the exact center frequency you want to listen to.

http://www.kwarc.org/ant-calc.html
Scott

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